Travel Log #13 “Connecting Rites of Passage and Digital Storytelling” By Andrew Rivera Rome, Italy

the difference of cultures, and values that each country and cities have compared to the United States. Many times in the states it is always on the go, going from place to place, activity after activity, never slowing down to smell the roses. Here in Europe the culture is much more laid back, and not so on the move. Personally when I was in elementary school and all throughout high school I can specifically remember that my parents and siblings tried our best to have a family dinner every night. With school, after school activities, and work for my parent’s dinner was the only time for us to spend together during the weekdays. My mother always tried to have all of us at the dinner table, and that was a time you didn’t want to miss out on. Even when I am home from college in the summer and on long breaks my family continuously tries to be at dinner five days a week. Now being in Europe, spending time with family and friends is very important to their everyday lives. Specifically, their lunch time is very long so they are able to see each other and take time out of their day to do so.  I love seeing this because family time, and just family in general is very important to me. My mother instilled that value on me at a very young age and it has really stuck with me. Back in the states I don’t see much of community based rituals and gatherings taking place very often. Usually it only happens for a big occasion, like a graduation, birthday, anniversary. And this to me is very unusual. Not having dinner with family and not having family outings almost every weekend is weird for me. My family tries to meet every day, and we also try to meet my aunts, uncles, and grandparents on Sundays. I believe that the people that don’t do this is a problem for themselves and the global community. This is a huge problem because family is the most important aspect of life. From birth to death, the people who are with you the whole way is family. You are connected by blood, and no one can else can have that connection.

Digital stories are a way to express yourself through pictures and videos, and put your own twist on the video. Here you can be a creator and make something that is completely yours. In this day in age where people are shying away from television and watching more Netflix and YouTube videos the power is in your hands. From the beginning of the semester up to this point in time, many things about myself have changed. The placed I have visited, people I have met, experienced I have felt, have made me change for the better. I saw the world and now I will be able to share it through my perspective and how I saw it. The three elements that had the most impact on myself is community values and ethics, obligation to a larger community, and lastly personal change. These three elements are the ones that I feel impacted me the most. In my digital story I can talk about my new values, volunteering, and how studying abroad changed me for the better. I think that I can create a moving digital story that will convey many meaningful messages.

I connected with Rachel Cox’s digital story. The dialogue that followed the pictures were very truthful and honest. They were relevant and were able to get her message across with the pictures providing something to look at. She was just a small caterpillar starting a new journey in Paris, now she is a butterfly that is able to fly and explore and not be scared of anything.IMG_5620

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One thought on “Travel Log #13 “Connecting Rites of Passage and Digital Storytelling” By Andrew Rivera Rome, Italy

  1. I love how being far away from home just strengthens the connection you feel towards your family. Seeing how important family is in other cultures is a great feeling. I felt the same connection with Rachel’s story. You are right in that it felt truthful and honest. I feel like that is an important part of the digital story process, to expose yourself. I’m excited to see your digital story!

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